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Stuart Goodman At Broadway Market

June 26, 2016
by the gentle author

John Sims

Take a walk through Broadway Market in March 1982 with Photographer Stuart Goodman, when it was quite a different place to the fashionable destination of today.

A former Fleet St Photographer & Picture Editor, Stuart sent me these pictures last week. “They were first shown in 1983 at an exhibition at the Royal Festival Hall, organised by the Greater London Council,” he explained, “which was ironic really because the GLC had a massive 1000-property compulsory purchase scheme to construct a nightmare version of the Westway through East London, that included the market.”

“I first found Broadway Market by mistake in 1976 and fell in love with the place, the cobbles, the people and the Cat & Mutton pub. By 1977, I was a partner in Hot Shots, a short-lived screen printing extravaganza, and I lived in an exceptionally squalid flat above and below the shop at number 52. I met both my wives there too, though – thankfully – not at the same time.

Although I lived in Broadway Market for a few years, I only photographed it once, wandering around for a couple of hours. Now I live in Norwich but I still have connections with the place, my sister-in-law was the ladybird book lady, running a stall opposite where I once lived, and my brother sells vinyl in the upmarket bit up the road.

I miss the place, not the squalor, the outside loo, the cold – but the people, the community and, somehow, the optimism. In those days, there was not a gastro pub in sight and no-one had ever heard of a buffalo burger. ”

Photographs copyright © Stuart Goodman

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22 Responses leave one →
  1. June 26, 2016

    I think, should I ever become a ridiculously rich, one of the things I would do would be to buy some London land and set up a huge market hall, with low rents in perpetuity.

  2. Jo Gourlay permalink
    June 26, 2016

    Such evocative photographs, thankyou. And had forgotten the name Percy Ingle!

  3. June 26, 2016

    Nice photos, haven’t been there since the early 60s. Valerie

  4. Peter Holford permalink
    June 26, 2016

    The seventh photo that shows the abandoned mini with the smashed windscreen brought back memories of how cars were often abandoned in that era. They could be in situ for months getting progressively vandalised, set alight and with jagged bits of metal. It seemed that nobody cared that they were there until the problem became so endemic that eventually local councils started to take action. Strange what memories can be triggered by a photo!

  5. Joel Drouet permalink
    June 26, 2016

    Brilliant, haunting, and evocative.

  6. Andy Sluckin permalink
    June 26, 2016

    How it’s changed! Good to have Stuart reminding us of what has been.

  7. Barbara permalink
    June 26, 2016

    I remember it well , buying mice from Carr’s pet shop , breeding them and selling the young mice back to Mr Carr for sixpence each ! Later , as a schoolgirl of about 15 , I had a Saturday job at Fox’s chemist . I remember Sims the florist , also Tiddiman’s Butchers and there was a fruit and veg stall run by Fred whose son took over when Fred passed away . Cook’s pie and mash shop is still there I believe which is a bit of a miracle . Great to see these photos .

  8. Caroline Gilfillan permalink
    June 26, 2016

    Excellent photos. I lived close by for a decade, and these photographs vividly evoke how it was. I’m sorry that these markets and small communities have been gobbled up by rampant money making – high rents and the sale of social housing. Beautiful London, shrinking by the day.

  9. June 27, 2016

    Ah, always look in vain for people I knew, in the 70s or 80s street pictures. One day!
    Funny, never ever noticed ‘squalor’ in my early roaming-around days. Unlike now, t’streets always felt so darn comfortable…
    ‘Beautiful London, shrinking by the day’ – love the comment.

  10. SPQR permalink
    June 27, 2016

    Fascinating photographs, so full of details that are stories in themselves. And I love reading the comments of people who knew these places—like Barbara, who bred mice bought from the pet shop and sold back their offspring.

  11. SPQR permalink
    June 27, 2016

    A shop called I. A. Blight—too perfect. You’d be thrown out of a fiction-writing class for calling a shop ‘Blight.’

  12. Annie Henriques permalink
    June 27, 2016

    I used to teach just up the road from the market in the late 70s and early 80s and I’ll always remember Bradburys which is still there! It’s the kind of ironmongers shop that sells absolutely everything – perfect for a school teacher that was always looking for unusual bits and pieces to make education that much more interesting. And that was before we had screens that did it all for us.

  13. June 27, 2016

    In those times I have been in England and Scotland. Big memories!

    Love & Peace
    ACHIM

  14. Peter Whear permalink
    June 27, 2016

    Every good photo tells a story and Stuart has told some captivating stories here.

  15. Alison Ashfield permalink
    June 28, 2016

    Oh my! I worked in Broadway Market between 1992 and 1996, in the new general practice: The London Fields Medical Centre. The street seemed to be at something of a nadir, very quiet, mostly shabby and generally forgotten. I believe the previous practice had been above the chemist’s shop at number 3 and was run by Dr. Tony Fernando. Nearly 4 very happy years spent there, I used the Post Office opposite, Percy Ingle’s bakery (Belgian buns and coffee meringues), the sandwich shop and the print shop and the supermarket which opened up next door and was run by an enterprising Turkish family. I was intrigued by the flat-breads that they sold, golden as harvest and huge. Nothing like the pallid, dusty white things ‘pitta bread’ sold in Sainsbury’s. Every summer and as often as I could, I would buy a pound of cherries from the coster-manger who had a stall just on the corner near ‘The Dove’ pub and eat the lot, mentally chanting ‘Tinker, tailor, soldier, sailor….’ as I ate my way through my lunch. Happy memories.

  16. June 29, 2016

    A very early memory, perhaps 19 46 0r 7. Free oranges were being given out . one per child, my grandad and I lined up for what seemed for ever, then we went to the back of the queue and lined up again.
    Nan and Grandad lived in Pownell Road.

  17. July 3, 2016

    I lived around the corner at Trederwen Rd in a prefab and as a 9 year old would go to the stall holders on a Saturday morning and take their urns for tea and charge them a penny! My dad, grhs, had a ‘shmutter’ stall opposite a bookies and we always did well. I’m talking about 1960 to 1964 when we emigrated to Los Angeles. I went to London fields primary school and went back last year. Blimey! what a difference.

  18. John Walton permalink
    August 5, 2016

    These pictures partly sum up the reasons why the level of migration out of Hackney in the 1960s-1980s was so high for those that could afford to do it. As a family that came from Hackney, no one now lives near. I too have returned and the change is transformational. For anyone that wants to see how the market looked like on the big screen check out the intro to the Phil Collins film “Buster” (1988) which was filmed in the market shortly after these images were taken.

  19. ian silverton permalink
    September 10, 2016

    Remember Harry Tiddermans Butcher shop on the broad way,he was my fathers friend,and we used my the family pub the Westminster Arms,as we used his shop,great meat. Remember him buying a American car from another friend Freddy Jones,big old lump,his wife hated it, very rare site in the 60s rundown east End.

  20. Pat Davies permalink
    September 18, 2016

    Hello Gentle Author

    I am writing this, because, I have heard of the sad news about, Colin O’brien.

    I am one of Barking and Dagenham, Hoppers, who you have met before, at the Holding Hands for Norton Folgate and we spoke at Heathway Library. You went out to Scotney Farm, with the Hoppers last September and also with Colin, this year shortly before his death. I unfortunately, was away on holiday, both times, but would have loved to have been there.
    We all went back to the farm on the 9th September, Kathrin and Sussanah, told us the sad news.

    I just wanted to send my Sincere Condolences. I admired Colin’s work, very much.
    I hope to be able to attend the memorial service. Perhaps you will let me know, Please, where and when it will be held.

    Kind Regards

    Pat Davies

  21. Kevin adams permalink
    October 30, 2016

    What memories!
    I used to work for John Sims the florist when I was about 10 and lived just around the corner in Dericote Street. The house with the motorbike covered up was ours and the Commer van opposite belonged to my dad.

  22. stuart goodman permalink
    December 5, 2016

    i’ve just heard the sad news that trevor, who ran the cat and mutton with his wife brenda at this time died a couple of years ago. the pub was one of the reasons i moved to the market, a brilliant home for so many!!! will never forget brenda’s mum dancing on the bar during the rio grande hot tango orchestra gigs on the occasional saturday night.

    we were there a couple of weeks ago and i cannot believe the changes. i photographed the market again with the poet caroline gilfillan for a project in ’05, which we showed at steve selby’s off broadway gallery. the changs since then are even more spectacular and in a way more depressing. maybe we’ll put the stuff up to the gentle author to show here.

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